Here is a further selection of articles in PDF format. Please download as many as you wish. Avoiding Plagiarism: Steps Authors Can Take by Harriet Hodgson. If you're a news junkie, you know topics and ideas can surface at the same time. This can create a problem for authors. While a writing idea is percolating in your mind, another author may have a similar idea. Your books may come out at the same time. Did one of you copy the other? No matter what your writing genre may be, these steps will help you avoid the accusation of plagiarism. The steps seem simple, but when you add them together, they form a protective shield. (02/16) Flash Fiction - What Is It and How Do You Write It? by Helen Khan. Flash fiction is having a comeback. It has been around for centuries but then it was called fables or parables up until the 20th century when it was called the short, short story; now it is called flash fiction. Some have even given it a technical term, "nano fiction". So what exactly is flash fiction? It is a literary style that is noted for its extreme brevity. The fictional piece can be as short as 53 words or as long as 1000, but generally it hovers around 250 to 1000 words. (05/16) The Female Detective - Personality Traits of Female Amateur Sleuths by Rayna Morgan. A cozy mystery is not interesting without a powerful and intellectual amateur female detective. Such fictional detective characters are known as sleuths. The amateur sleuth in a cozy mystery typically has no official association with law enforcement agencies; she may appear at crime scenes, but she's not paid for her services. (12/16) Using All the Senses in Writing by Megan Easley-Walsh As a writing consultant and in my own work, crafting effective writing is a must. In fiction, creating a cast of characters and an engaging plot are the bedrock of a successful story. One of the best ways to do that is to paint the story with vibrant descriptions that will draw the reader in. (01/17) Creative Writing: How To Write Convincing Characters by Samuel Hall In creative writing, the stories we remember best are those with unforgettable characters - Skywalker, Scarlett, Scout. Characterization is inseparable from the story. One way to give our characters form and substance is to begin with people you know. A trio of famous dreamers - Jay Gatsby, Don Quixote and Alice in Wonderland - all began as people their authors knew. (02/17) The Character Arc: Leading Your Protagonist from Denial to Action by Tamar Sloan. Our characters have a problem, a problem that will spark our plot and drive their arc. As a reader, it's the transformation from refusal and denial to acceptance then action that I love experiencing, and judging by the popularity of the book industry (an estimated 113 billion dollars globally!), I'm going to predict so do a few other people. As a writer, it can be one of the toughest parts to write. Capturing that deeply primal, psychological struggle onto the pages of a book is no easy feat. (03/17) Expose Yourself - How To Write With Personality by Margaret E Crum. Everyone likes a good story especially when it comes from an excellent storyteller. You know the type, that person who can engage your attention and spin a yarn so intriguing that they actually draw you in and capture your interest until the end, leaving you longing for more. It is the manner in which the story is told that makes it something worth listening to, or in this case, something worth reading. (04/17) Overcoming Your Fear Of Writing by Sheldon D. Newton. My experience of writing books began with a book I never published out of fear that it would be rejected by readers. And because of that 'fear of failure' even though I had the book ready to go, I never went ahead and got it done. (05/17) The Joy of Writing by Joanna M Leone. I can still remember my teacher's voice as she said, "Class, please take out your writing journals." I jumped with excitement as I reached into my desk for my light blue journal. Since my family knew that I loved to write, they always bought me sparkly pink and silver pencils. It really made writing more fun! However, some of my friends groaned in agony when they realized that math class was over and it was time to write! I always smiled at my friends and I said, "Just think about something you love or something that makes you smile. Writing is easy if you think with your heart." (06/17) Ways to Become a Guru Among Present-Day Writers by Jessica Freeman. J. D. Salinger was a very private person, who tended to express his thoughts and emotions the way all other writers do: through writing. Can you imagine the struggles of a half Jewish man fighting in World War 2? It's no wonder why Salinger was so disappointed from humanity that he withdrew from public view when Catcher in the Rye achieved success immediately after being published. (07/17) Kindle and the World of Self-Publishing by Rob Hillman. Amazon is the best marketplace in the world and it offers authors, new and renowned, with numerous opportunities in terms of readership growth and sales. You should know though that although publishing on the Kindle platform is readily accessible, it does come with its fair share of obstacles, especially those concerning formatting and design. (08/17) Surprising Voice  by Christina St Clair. Writing, when I started out years ago, seemed a way I might quench a longing I couldn't even name. I certainly didn't understand there was such a thing as voice which I now realize is an important aspect of becoming a writer. (09/17) Stopping in the Right Way to Boost Productivity by Irene Roth What if I said that you can be more productive if you learned how to stop and rest at the right time? It sounds counterintuitive but there is a lot of truth to it. In fact, there are many psychologists and philosophers now who are exploring this theme in their work lives and their findings are absolutely wonderful. (10/17) Have an Itch for a Writer's Niche? by Tedric Garrison. You've been writing for ten years, and someone asks, "What's your niche?" Do you know what to say? If you respond, "I write articles," or "short stories," or "novels," you just answered wrong. These are all types of writing or categories that you write in. A writer's niche is usually defined as: "a distinct segment of the writing market." The key word being, "distinct." (11/17)
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Here is a further selection of articles in PDF format. Please download as many as you wish. Avoiding Plagiarism: Steps Authors Can Take by Harriet Hodgson. If you're a news junkie, you know topics and ideas can surface at the same time. This can create a problem for authors. While a writing idea is percolating in your mind, another author may have a similar idea. Your books may come out at the same time. Did one of you copy the other? No matter what your writing genre may be, these steps will help you avoid the accusation of plagiarism. The steps seem simple, but when you add them together, they form a protective shield. (02/16) Flash Fiction - What Is It and How Do You Write It? by Helen Khan. Flash fiction is having a comeback. It has been around for centuries but then it was called fables or parables up until the 20th century when it was called the short, short story; now it is called flash fiction. Some have even given it a technical term, "nano fiction". So what exactly is flash fiction? It is a literary style that is noted for its extreme brevity. The fictional piece can be as short as 53 words or as long as 1000, but generally it hovers around 250 to 1000 words. (05/16) The Female Detective - Personality Traits of Female Amateur Sleuths by Rayna Morgan. A cozy mystery is not interesting without a powerful and intellectual amateur female detective. Such fictional detective characters are known as sleuths. The amateur sleuth in a cozy mystery typically has no official association with law enforcement agencies; she may appear at crime scenes, but she's not paid for her services. (12/16) Using All the Senses in Writing by Megan Easley-Walsh As a writing consultant and in my own work, crafting effective writing is a must. In fiction, creating a cast of characters and an engaging plot are the bedrock of a successful story. One of the best ways to do that is to paint the story with vibrant descriptions that will draw the reader in. (01/17) Creative Writing: How To Write Convincing Characters by Samuel Hall In creative writing, the stories we remember best are those with unforgettable characters - Skywalker, Scarlett, Scout. Characterization is inseparable from the story. One way to give our characters form and substance is to begin with people you know. A trio of famous dreamers - Jay Gatsby, Don Quixote and Alice in Wonderland - all began as people their authors knew. (02/17) The Character Arc: Leading Your Protagonist from Denial to Action by Tamar Sloan. Our characters have a problem, a problem that will spark our plot and drive their arc. As a reader, it's the transformation from refusal and denial to acceptance then action that I love experiencing, and judging by the popularity of the book industry (an estimated 113 billion dollars globally!), I'm going to predict so do a few other people. As a writer, it can be one of the toughest parts to write. Capturing that deeply primal, psychological struggle onto the pages of a book is no easy feat. (03/17) Expose Yourself - How To Write With Personality by Margaret E Crum. Everyone likes a good story especially when it comes from an excellent storyteller. You know the type, that person who can engage your attention and spin a yarn so intriguing that they actually draw you in and capture your interest until the end, leaving you longing for more. It is the manner in which the story is told that makes it something worth listening to, or in this case, something worth reading. (04/17) Overcoming Your Fear Of Writing by Sheldon D. Newton. My experience of writing books began with a book I never published out of fear that it would be rejected by readers. And because of that 'fear of failure' even though I had the book ready to go, I never went ahead and got it done. (05/17) The Joy of Writing by Joanna M Leone. I can still remember my teacher's voice as she said, "Class, please take out your writing journals." I jumped with excitement as I reached into my desk for my light blue journal. Since my family knew that I loved to write, they always bought me sparkly pink and silver pencils. It really made writing more fun! However, some of my friends groaned in agony when they realized that math class was over and it was time to write! I always smiled at my friends and I said, "Just think about something you love or something that makes you smile. Writing is easy if you think with your heart." (06/17) Ways to Become a Guru Among Present-Day Writers by Jessica Freeman. J. D. Salinger was a very private person, who tended to express his thoughts and emotions the way all other writers do: through writing. Can you imagine the struggles of a half Jewish man fighting in World War 2? It's no wonder why Salinger was so disappointed from humanity that he withdrew from public view when Catcher in the Rye achieved success immediately after being published. (07/17) Kindle and the World of Self-Publishing by Rob Hillman. Amazon is the best marketplace in the world and it offers authors, new and renowned, with numerous opportunities in terms of readership growth and sales. You should know though that although publishing on the Kindle platform is readily accessible, it does come with its fair share of obstacles, especially those concerning formatting and design. (08/17) Surprising Voice  by Christina St Clair. Writing, when I started out years ago, seemed a way I might quench a longing I couldn't even name. I certainly didn't understand there was such a thing as voice which I now realize is an important aspect of becoming a writer. (09/17) Stopping in the Right Way to Boost Productivity by Irene Roth What if I said that you can be more productive if you learned how to stop and rest at the right time? It sounds counterintuitive but there is a lot of truth to it. In fact, there are many psychologists and philosophers now who are exploring this theme in their work lives and their findings are absolutely wonderful. (10/17) Have an Itch for a Writer's Niche? by Tedric Garrison. You've been writing for ten years, and someone asks, "What's your niche?" Do you know what to say? If you respond, "I write articles," or "short stories," or "novels," you just answered wrong. These are all types of writing or categories that you write in. A writer's niche is usually defined as: "a distinct segment of the writing market." The key word being, "distinct." (11/17)
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